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Back in February, I happened upon a cardboard box underneath a 18th century settee in some dusty corner of a local antique shop. Recalling many stories of people who have found treasures this way, I pulled out the box to sort through them. There with pealing pages and badly torn was an honest to goodness Victorian fashion magazine. I was beside myself! I stumbled upon an original. My friend who accompanied me, helped bargain the deal. Every month since my purchase, I have photographed and shared eight pages of The Standard Designer June’s 1896 edition.

I restate the condition of the periodical is borderline deplorable and my photography is clearly not a skill I possess. However, I feel it needs to be shared in all its remaining glory, because 1) I cannot find a copy online 2) I scour the internet just for these types of images and surely others do, as well. So if someone was holding something back, it would sadden me. No sad faces here! Hence, my sharing.

As mentioned in other The Standard Designer posts, if you have a burning desire to see a higher resolution image, please let me know in the comment section and I will happily scan the page you desire. It would be no trouble, as I work in the library. It’s not like I would be making any special trip or the like. So don’t be shy, if you want a better shot for the costume you are making, frock you are designing, using it on a vision board, or whatever the case may be.

Enjoy the stories, hats, wedding dresses and the like!

Page 61 (Continuing the story Cross Purposes by Julia De Kay) " As he was much taller and broader than either of them, it was difficult to repress a smile when he entered the drawing-room clad in trousers above his ankles and a coat that refused to meet across his broad chest."

Page 61 (Continuing the story Cross Purposes by Julia De Kay) “As he was much taller and broader than either of them, it was difficult to repress a smile when he entered the drawing-room clad in trousers above his ankles and a coat that refused to meet across his broad chest.”

Page 62 "In 1871, Miss Willard was made President of the Woman's College at Evanston, and later, when this college became part of the University, she was made Dean, and Professor of Aesthetics."

Page 62 “In 1871, Miss Willard was made President of the Woman’s College at Evanston, and later, when this college became part of the University, she was made Dean, and Professor of Aesthetics.”

Page 63 "In trimming, the colors used defy description, for few well-trimmed hats have les than four colors--of course including those in the fancy ribbon--and most have anywhere from six to a dozen."

Page 63 “In trimming, the colors used defy description, for few well-trimmed hats have les than four colors–of course including those in the fancy ribbon–and most have anywhere from six to a dozen.”

Page 64 [Upper right picture] "The sides of the crown are covered by a band of brown velvet against which cream-white roses are closely pressed all around."

Page 64 [Upper right picture] “The sides of the crown are covered by a band of brown velvet against which cream-white roses are closely pressed all around.”

Page 65 "A large trousseau is not absolutely necessary, but a judicious selection of lingerie, shoes, stockings, gloves, and all the many toilette comforts, is advisable, as these things do not go so noticeably out of fashion and will last for years--some of them forever."

Page 65 “A large trousseau is not absolutely necessary, but a judicious selection of lingerie, shoes, stockings, gloves, and all the many toilette comforts, is advisable, as these things do not go so noticeably out of fashion and will last for years–some of them forever.”

Page 66 "Satin is the material that most used at present for wedding gowns--that of a quality that is rich, heavy, and lustrous."

Page 66 “Satin is the material that most used at present for wedding gowns–that of a quality that is rich, heavy, and lustrous.”

Page 67 "When so many [graduates] are dressed in white are all together, it is very difficult to make any very noticeable difference between them, but as each girl infuses her individuality into her dress, this stumbling block is somewhat lessened."

Page 67 “When so many [graduates] are dressed in white are all together, it is very difficult to make any very noticeable difference between them, but as each girl infuses her individuality into her dress, this stumbling block is somewhat lessened.”

Page 68 [Right picture] "The dress is of white India silk and the fichu is of chiffon finished with an accordion-pleated ruffle."

Page 68 [Right picture] “The dress is of white India silk and the fichu is of chiffon finished with an accordion-pleated ruffle.”

 

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