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Yes, this is another Standard Design post. There will be another next week, as well and then I will return to our regularly schedule program; once a month. Just a brief overview, a past friend of mine and I chanced on a June 1896 edition of Standard Designer at the bottom of a dusty box in an out of the way antique store. This was back in February. Every month hence I have taken photographs with my lil phone to share eight pages of the Victorian fashion periodical. Due to a very emotional personal matter, I was barely alive on the blog for a few months. As I pick up the pieces and figure things out, I am getting back to my editorial calendar. Come November, I should be back on track.

My issue of the Standard Designer is badly damaged. The pages are delicate and brittle. I apologize for my photography skills. If any reader desires to see a higher resolution version of a particular page, let me know in the comments and I will skip over to the library and scan a much more readable copy for you.

I have yet to hear if any of you, Dear Readers, reside in New York City . . . If you do, please let me know in the comment section.

Page 53: Summer Fancy Work "Pretty white hands never look so attractive as when they are engaged in some picturesque handiwork--their dimples half hidden amid the meshes of lace-netting, or their whiteness contrasted with bright silks or soft wools."

Page 53: Summer Fancy Work “Pretty white hands never look so attractive as when they are engaged in some picturesque handiwork–their dimples half hidden amid the meshes of lace-netting, or their whiteness contrasted with bright silks or soft wools.”

Page 54, "The linen napkin ring is quite a novelty, and like the sachets, can always be restored to pristine freshness by laundering."

Page 54, “The linen napkin ring is quite a novelty, and like the sachets, can always be restored to pristine freshness by laundering.”

Page 55 How to Read Character V. The Mouth, "Gluttony and sensuality, as well as many of the noblest virtues of mind and heart, are also here recognizable to the astute observer."

Page 55 How to Read Character V. The Mouth, “Gluttony and sensuality, as well as many of the noblest virtues of mind and heart, are also here recognizable to the astute observer.”

 

Page 56 "The bow-shaped mouth, with the corners curving upward, evidences haughtiness combined with unlimited conceit; it is most frequently seen in the countenances of our money-made "aristocracy."

Page 56 “The bow-shaped mouth, with the corners curving upward, evidences haughtiness combined with unlimited conceit; it is most frequently seen in the countenances of our money-made “aristocracy.”

Page 57, Summer Dress Accessories "For the summer months, capes are undoubtedly more desirable than jackets."--Good to know! Here I thought they were perfect for Fall. How silly of me!

Page 57, Summer Dress Accessories “For the summer months, capes are undoubtedly more desirable than jackets.”–Good to know! Here I thought they were perfect for Fall. How silly of me!

Page 58 "It seems useless to say anything further about collarettes. Their name is legion, their variety infinite."

Page 58 “It seems useless to say anything further about collarettes. Their name is legion, their variety infinite.”

Page 58 "It seems useless to say anything further about collarettes. Their name is legion, their variety infinite."

Page 58 “It seems useless to say anything further about collarettes. Their name is legion, their variety infinite.”

Page 59 "Belts are taking a prominent place in summer toilettes; marrow leather ones are, perhaps, the nicest. They come in kid, white, black, gray, brown, tan and green; and in lizard, alligator, seal and fancy leathers. The most stylish are not more than an inch wide."

Page 59 “Belts are taking a prominent place in summer toilettes; marrow leather ones are, perhaps, the nicest. They come in kid, white, black, gray, brown, tan and green; and in lizard, alligator, seal and fancy leathers. The most stylish are not more than an inch wide.”

Page 60 Cross Purposes by Julia DeKay, Chapter 1 "No, mamma," she answered in a cold, hard voice. "I should never dream of taking such a liberty as to think about myself. . . ."

Page 60 Cross Purposes by Julia DeKay, Chapter 1 “No, mamma,” she answered in a cold, hard voice. “I should never dream of taking such a liberty as to think about myself. . . .”

 

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