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Reading Boy’s Own Paper by Josh Hassall

I am behind in posting images from The Standard Designer. The last installment was back in July, prior to the destruction of my engagement. So this October, you shall see an influx of Standard Designer posts as I catch up. Back in February, a friend and I discovered the June1896 issue of The Standard Designer, essentially a fashion periodical of the time in an out-of-the-way antique store down town. Clearly, some child had used the magazine as a coloring book, much to my horror. The condition is pretty awful, but all the pages are accounted for. Initially, I was sharing eight pages of The Standard Designer on 19th Century Modern every month. As previously mentioned, I had stopped posting pictures while I recovered from my loss. Again, these photographs were taken with my phone. So the quality or lack there, of is evident. Should anyone be interested in a high quality scans, please let me know and I shall take the magazine down to my place of work (I am a public librarian, after all) and scan the desired pages for you.

At this point in the periodical, The Standard Designer is moving away from Women’s Fashion and focusing on Children’s clothes styles, accessories, even. Now on to the latest images!

Page 45--Middle dress 3035. "Nothing daintier than the model shown in th present illustration could be chosen for the little ones during the summer. The front view shows the dress developed in white lawn strewn with violets, worn with a guimpe; and the back view shows the effect when made up in dark blue challis with a sleeve puffs and yoke of red silk."

Page 45–Middle dress 3035. “Nothing daintier than the model shown in the present illustration could be chosen for the little ones during the summer. The front view shows the dress developed in white lawn strewn with violets, worn with a guimpe; and the back view shows the effect when made up in dark blue challis with a sleeve puffs and yoke of red silk.”

 

Page 46--Left Boy 3056. "As represented in the picture, the suit is made of white pique. The sailor collar is made of red linen edged with white braid. A bow and ends of red gross-grain ribbon, and an anchor worked in the red cotton on the shield give a stylish effect. The pleats of the cuffs and the pocket are stitched with red."

Page 46–Left Boy 3056. “As represented in the picture, the suit is made of white pique. The sailor collar is made of red linen edged with white braid. A bow and ends of red gross-grain ribbon, and an anchor worked in the red cotton on the shield give a stylish effect. The pleats of the cuffs and the pocket are stitched with red.”

Page 47--Girl Middle 2982. "As shown in the illustration the little gown is made of light blue figured challis trimmed in with narrow blue velvet ribbon."

Page 47–Girl Middle 2982. “As shown in the illustration the little gown is made of light blue figured challis trimmed in with narrow blue velvet ribbon.”

Page 48--Upper Right Infant Sacque 3052. "A very serviceable little garment for infants' wear is here illustrated as made of cream-colored French flannel, daintily trimmed with cream satin ribbon and Valenciennes lace and embroidered with cream wash silk. Cream ribbon was used for the bow."

Page 48–Upper Right Infant Sacque 3052. “A very serviceable little garment for infants’ wear is here illustrated as made of cream-colored French flannel, daintily trimmed with cream satin ribbon and Valenciennes lace and embroidered with cream wash silk. Cream ribbon was used for the bow.”

Page 49--Upper Right Infants' Dress 3082. "A very dainty dress for infants' wear is here shown as made of white nainsook, trimmed with lace edgings and insertion."

Page 49–Upper Right Infants’ Dress 3082. “A very dainty dress for infants’ wear is here shown as made of white nainsook, trimmed with lace edgings and insertion.”

Page 50 "The useful umbrella, like the poor, is always with us, at all times and seasons, but the parasol is a gay butterfly that only puts in an appearance when fine weather is assured."---This line would not fly, in Modern times!

Page 50 “The useful umbrella, like the poor, is always with us, at all times and seasons, but the parasol is a gay butterfly that only puts in an appearance when fine weather is assured.”—This line would not fly, in Modern times!

Page 51--"Another style of handle, which is attractive from its oddity rather than its beauty, is of box-wood with a hole o\a few inches from the top, from which peeps a tiny carved animal, a mouse or a Lilliputian puppy or kitten, with diamond, emerald, or ruby eyes. The little head and fore paws show on one side and the tail and hind quarters on the other making a cross-stick to the handle."

Page 51–“Another style of handle, which is attractive from its oddity rather than its beauty, is of box-wood with a hole o\a few inches from the top, from which peeps a tiny carved animal, a mouse or a Lilliputian puppy or kitten, with diamond, emerald, or ruby eyes. The little head and fore paws show on one side and the tail and hind quarters on the other making a cross-stick to the handle.”

Page 52--An anniversary party where the husband and wife invite 12 couples and the men participate an impromptu sewing contest. Light and dainty food is served.--This sounds REALLY dumb to our Modern ears. I cannot imagine any 21st century man partaking in this "fun."

Page 52–An anniversary party where the husband and wife invite 12 couples and the men participate an impromptu sewing contest. Light and dainty food is served.–This sounds REALLY dumb to our Modern ears. I cannot imagine any 21st century man partaking in this “fun.”

Also, do any of you, dear readers, happen to live in New York City? I have a small request for a photograph of the former headquarters of The Standard Designer. . .

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