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By Jessie Willcox-Smith

It has been six months since my future mother-in-law, Senora M and I perchanced on a marvelous 1896 June edition of The Standard Designer; a fashion magazine at Terminus Antique store. The condition is rather deplorable, with its crumbling pages, marker colorings from a young child, and torn out sections. Despite all the wear and tear of over a century, every single page is present. Over the course of half a year, I have documented eight pages at a time of this periodical every month, in effort to share it with the public. These sheets are not scanned in, but directly taken from my mobile phone. I personally do not own a scanner, but should some reader be more interested in a finely detailed page, do not hesitate to comment and I will scoot down to the public library and scan the request. I am also seriously considering discussing preservation methods with my friend, who happens to be the director of the local historical society/local museum. Now, getting on with the images:

Page 37. (Bottom right) This dainty little gown is here made of white challis with a green figure and the decoration consists of white lace and lace insertion.

Page 37. (Bottom right) This dainty little gown is here made of white challis with a green figure and the decoration consists of white lace and lace insertion.

 

Page 38 (Bottom left) In our illustration we have shown the suit plainly developed in a blue surge, with black braiding. An equally serviceable dress could be made of pique, braided or plain. Any light woolen material would also be suitable, particularly flannel, etamines, cheviot and tweed, and the jacket might be made of one of these fabrics while the skirt could be a gingham, percale, chambray, etc.

Page 38 (Bottom left) In our illustration we have shown the suit plainly developed in a blue surge, with black braiding. An equally serviceable dress could be made of pique, braided or plain. Any light woolen material would also be suitable, particularly flannel, etamines, cheviot and tweed, and the jacket might be made of one of these fabrics while the skirt could be a gingham, percale, chambray, etc.

 

Page 39. (Top right) Lawn or embroidery are the materials used for this corset cover which is especially suitable for wear beneath thin dresses or shirt waists, when a close-fitting cover is not desirable.

Page 39. (Top right) Lawn or embroidery are the materials used for this corset cover which is especially suitable for wear beneath thin dresses or shirt waists, when a close-fitting cover is not desirable.

 

Page 40. (Bottom left) Serge silk, cravenette, brilliantine, mohair, outing flannel, cashmere, etc., are all suitable fabrics for developing this suit, and braid or machine-stitching will form the most stylish and appropriate trimming.

Page 40. (Bottom left) Serge silk, cravenette, brilliantine, mohair, outing flannel, cashmere, etc., are all suitable fabrics for developing this suit, and braid or machine-stitching will form the most stylish and appropriate trimming.

 

Page 42 (Middle left) We have shown this costume fashioned from pink pique, the collar and cuffs trimmed with fine white embroidery. It is equally well adapted to all other wash materials of moderate weight, such as linen, embroidered batiste, duck and canvas, and would be extremely stylish if made of light cloth such as etamine, mohair, cheviot or serge.

Page 42 (Middle left) We have shown this costume fashioned from pink pique, the collar and cuffs trimmed with fine white embroidery. It is equally well adapted to all other wash materials of moderate weight, such as linen, embroidered batiste, duck and canvas, and would be extremely stylish if made of light cloth such as etamine, mohair, cheviot or serge.

Page 43 (Middle left) The pictured jacket was made of rose-colored pique with a small white dot. White-pearl buttons were used for fastening and to adorn the sleeves, and white embroidery trimmed the collar.

Page 43 (Middle left) The pictured jacket was made of rose-colored pique with a small white dot. White-pearl buttons were used for fastening and to adorn the sleeves, and white embroidery trimmed the collar.

 

Page 44 (Bottom right) The pretty little dress illustrated herewith is made of fine white organdie with a tiny dot of pale blue.

Page 44 (Bottom right) The pretty little dress illustrated herewith is made of fine white organdie with a tiny dot of pale blue.

 

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