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The fifth installment of The Standard Designer is here for those eagerly awaiting the slow continuation of the June 1896 periodical I purchased a while ago. I figure if I post my typical eight pages every month, I shall be done by next year. Goodness! Makes things a bit suspenseful, eh? Again, the physical quality of the magazine low. The pages are brittle and torn. As we move through the periodical, it becomes less about dresses and more about accessories and lifestyle of the time. In which case, there are fewer line drawing and more text. I am too afraid to scan the whole magazine at this time, in part because I do not own a scanner. So please bare with me when we arrive at those parts. I hope you enjoy the next eight pages, Dear Readers. I apologize for the blurry images, they looked crisp at the time of execution.

P. 29 (Skirt Bottom)This pattern is an especially useful and graceful design for developing in silk, satin and other narrow-width goods, but serge, tweed, cheviot, cashmere, Henrietta, brilliantine, crepon or any seasonable material usually employed for this purpose may also be used with satisfactory results.

P. 29 (Skirt Bottom)This pattern is an especially useful and graceful design for developing in silk, satin and other narrow-width goods, but serge, tweed, cheviot, cashmere, Henrietta, brilliantine, crepon or any seasonable material usually employed for this purpose may also be used with satisfactory results.

P. 30 (Blouse center) A plain band collar is sewed to the neck edge, and a round tab of velvet, with two pointed tabs of challis is sewed to the upper edge of the plain collar.

P. 30 (Blouse center) A plain band collar is sewed to the neck edge, and a round tab of velvet, with two pointed tabs of challis is sewed to the upper edge of the plain collar.

P. 31 (Collarettes Bottom) This collarette can be made of one material, or of a combination, such as silk and chiffon, net and lace, or velvet and silk.

P. 31 (Collarettes Bottom) This collarette can be made of one material, or of a combination, such as silk and chiffon, net and lace, or velvet and silk.

P. 32 (Bathing Suit Bottom) As illustrated the suit is made of black brilliantine, trimmed with rows of narrow scarlet braid.

P. 32 (Bathing Suit Bottom) As illustrated the suit is made of black brilliantine, trimmed with rows of narrow scarlet braid.

P. 33 The pretty little gown shown in the illustration is suitable not only for afternoon wear, or Commencement Day ceremonies, but can be most attractively developed in percales, chambrays or ginghams for morning hours.

P. 33 The pretty little gown shown in the illustration is suitable not only for afternoon wear, or Commencement Day ceremonies, but can be most attractively developed in percales, chambrays or ginghams for morning hours.

P. 34 This suit is represented as made of a thing quality of blue and white striped diagonal, the facings on the revers being dark blue velvet and the vest of white silk with a dark blue figure.

P. 34 This suit is represented as made of a thing quality of blue and white striped diagonal, the facings on the revers being dark blue velvet and the vest of white silk with a dark blue figure.

P. 35 As illustrated, the waist was made of white lawn figured with light blue.

P. 35 As illustrated, the waist was made of white lawn figured with light blue.

P. 36 A very useful costume for walking, driving, and general wear, is here shown as made of blue and white serge, stylishly finished with machine stitching and trimmed with bone buttons.

P. 36 A very useful costume for walking, driving, and general wear, is here shown as made of blue and white serge, stylishly finished with machine stitching and trimmed with bone buttons.

 

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